Kangiqsujuaq Club News

Paraski près du cratère des Pingualuit

Paraski près du cratère des Pingualuit, Nunavik, Québec

 

Pour tout amateur de kite, ce territoire immense, dépourvu d’arbres et recouvert de glace huit mois par année, est un terrain de jeu de prédilection pour partir à l’aventure.

En mars dernier, un premier projet pilote de développement touristique en kiteski a été testé dans le premier parc national a voir le jour au Nunavik en 2007, au parc national des Pingaluit, situé à environ 90 km de la communauté inuite de Kangiqsujuaq.
Suite
par Guillaume Roy



Article complet en PDF                   FaceBook Photos

Publié dans Kitebordermagazine le 13 décembre 2014,

Pour des informations additionnelles:
















Nunavik: The kiteski paradise

Nunavik Kite Ski Paradise                        


Inuit youth reclaiming their land
By Guillaume Roy

Featured in Above & Beyond July / August 2013

With eight-month long winters and ice as far as the eye can see, Nunavik is a kiteskiing paradise for those willing to give it a shot. Over the past seven years, over 1,500 people have learned to kite – ski in 15 communities in Nunavik and Nunavut. And more keep coming.

At the northernmost Quebec village, a light snow sweeps across as strong northern winds blow at 40km/h. Snow has been falling all night and 15 cm of fresh packed snow covers the bay. Blue, red, white, green and yellow forms are speeding up left and right in the Ivujivik bay. Looking closer, one can see skiers being pulled by colourful kites flying around. It’s a spectacular sight for the curious villagers who barely knew what kiteskiing was just a few days prior.

They better get used to it because when you begin to kiteski, it completely changes the way you see the world. Every time the wind blows, it makes you wonder if it is strong enough to ride. It turns on a brain connection that makes you crave to go out on your skis and ride as fast as the wind can pull you. It happens to me every time and I am always impressed how fast people become addicted to kiteskiing.

“It’s too much fun to miss. I don’t want to waste good wind anymore. Before, I thought that on a nice day, there should be no wind. I now despise those nice days,” says Aulla Qaunnaaluk, only five days after he first learned how to kite. No wonder why alianattuk, which means fun, was one of the first Inuktitut words I learned after anuri (wind).

Read more on Above & Beyond

Nunavik: The kiteski paradise

Nunavik Kite Ski Paradise                        


Inuit youth reclaiming their land
By Guillaume Roy

Featured in Above & Beyond July / August 2013

With eight-month long winters and ice as far as the eye can see, Nunavik is a kiteskiing paradise for those willing to give it a shot. Over the past seven years, over 1,500 people have learned to kite – ski in 15 communities in Nunavik and Nunavut. And more keep coming.

At the northernmost Quebec village, a light snow sweeps across as strong northern winds blow at 40km/h. Snow has been falling all night and 15 cm of fresh packed snow covers the bay. Blue, red, white, green and yellow forms are speeding up left and right in the Ivujivik bay. Looking closer, one can see skiers being pulled by colourful kites flying around. It’s a spectacular sight for the curious villagers who barely knew what kiteskiing was just a few days prior.

They better get used to it because when you begin to kiteski, it completely changes the way you see the world. Every time the wind blows, it makes you wonder if it is strong enough to ride. It turns on a brain connection that makes you crave to go out on your skis and ride as fast as the wind can pull you. It happens to me every time and I am always impressed how fast people become addicted to kiteskiing.

“It’s too much fun to miss. I don’t want to waste good wind anymore. Before, I thought that on a nice day, there should be no wind. I now despise those nice days,” says Aulla Qaunnaaluk, only five days after he first learned how to kite. No wonder why alianattuk, which means fun, was one of the first Inuktitut words I learned after anuri (wind).

Read more on Above & Beyond

2012 Nunavik Kite Ski Championship

IMG_7635.jpgKangiqsujuaq
2012  Nunavik Kite-Ski Championship, a Big Success!

Kangiqsujuaq, Québec, April 23, 2012 – Between April 18-22, 2012, the Northern Village of Kangiqsujuaq and the Recreation Department of the Kativik Regional Government (KRG) hosted the Nunavik Kite-Ski Championship in collaboration with the Arctic Wind Riders Team.
See Nunatsiq News pre race article: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674kite-skiers_take_to_nunaviks_hudson_strait/

Twenty-one participants between the ages of 14 and 55 came from seven Nunavik communities (Kuujjuaq, Quaqtaq, Aupaluk, Salluit, Kangirsuk, Puvirnituq and Kangiqsujuaq) and one Nunavut community (Pangnirtung) to compete in three different styles of racing and to attend workshops in kite-ski safety and riding techniques, kite-ski club operations and leadership, equipment maintenance and a downhill-ski clinic.

Sunny weather graced the entire five-day event, but only three days had enough wind for racing and other competitions on the bay. Over 30 spectators attended the events every day.

Congratulation to all participants of the Nunavik Kite Ski Championship.

Image_23.png1st Sandy Haukai  -  Puvirnituq, 12 pts
2nd Ahuya May  - Kuujjuaq, 28 pts
3rd Joanasie Sivuarapik  - Puvirnituq  35 pts
4th Peter Arngaq – Kangiqsujuaq  - 40 pts
5th Peter Qissiq – Kangiqsujuaq - 49p ts

Pictures of the riders on Facebook
More pictures on Nunavik Kite Ski Facebook
VIDEO de François Carrier Déziel

THE EVENT
This year Arctic Wind Riders team included experienced riders Alain Bernier, Pierre Luc Godbout and myself Guy Laflamme.  All along the five (5) days activity program, we had to compose with light wind, calm days and sudden gusts. Still, the team managed to organize 4 type of races; 

IMG_8525.jpgLong distance triangles , PICTURE
Short course triangle 
Point to point challenge
Point to point grouped

On three (3) calm periods, we took advantage of Kangiqsujuaq mountains to provide downhill-ski clinics. Turn out that everybody either carved their skis or snowboard on these steep hills with enthusiam and, at the end, managed to ski the slalom course like expert.  Wall climbing evening clinic also provided some excitement to participants. 

Overall, the great participation of racers/instructors and their enthusiasm in everyday activities; kite-ski races or workshops in kite-ski safety and riding techniques, equipment maintenance, kite-ski club operations and leadership, made this event a big success for the participants, the host community and the organizers.

Host community and Local Club Organisation
Kangiqsujuaq club organisation with their large tractable cabin on the ice and adjacent container for material set a new standards for club operations. It provides lots of space, includes; bench,  rack for boots, and makes it and ideal to hold a regional race. Community support from Town General manager Stéphane Appleby provided comfort, and support to riders and officials all along and made this event really unique.

Site accessibility
In Kangiqsujuaq the riding spot is just there at 200” from the shore,  at  Coop General Store door step. You can easily walk, ski and of course access it by snowmobile. All the equipment is stored in an adjacent container to free-up the shack.

What a great championship!
On a personal note; Thank you to all racers/instructors for your dynamic and enthusiast participation in every day activity. You are just amazing. Thank you Ben and Lucas for putting together a group of so many talented and motivated riders/instructors from around Nunavik, and thanks you for making this a happening.
Thank you George, Peter & Peter, Lukaci for your very special support and friendship and congratulation for your club organization. Thank you Stefan and to the community of Kangiqsujuaq for providing such a great environment and support for the riders and the event organization and operation.
Thank you Alain and Pierre-Luc, for your essential and precious support all along the event.
And most of all, thank you all for your friendship.
I can’t wait to the next one! Yeeeeeppppp!

Special thanks to KRG and all the sponsors and supporters of this championship, Air Inuit, First Air, Makivik, Sogo Active, Paraski Flex, Taamani and the host community Kangiqsujuaq and it’ Coop Store

Sogo Active, a national program that promotes physical activity to youth provided a total of 3500$,  1000$ to three community clubs from Nunavik Québec and 500$ for a club in Pangnirtung Nunavut.

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Nunavik holds 2013 Kite ski championship

Kite-skiers speed in front of the sea ice in Kangiqsujuaq where the Nunavik kite-ski championship took place earlier this month. (PHOTO BY GEORGE ANAUTAQ PIRLUTUUT)

"One of the fastest growing sports in the region"

From Nunasiaq News online

Under sunny skies and favourable winds, 10 kite-skiers recently took to the ice in front of the Hudson Strait community of Kangiqsujuaq, when the municipality and the Kativik Regional Government’s recreation department hosted the second annual Nunavik kite-ski championshipFromt April 11 to April 15, 10 participants,13 and up, from Kangiqsujuaq, Ivujivik, Quaqtaq, Kangirsuk, Kuujjuaq and Kangiqsualujjuaq, competed in different styles of racing.

More on Nunasiaq News online ;   http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674nunavik_holds_kite-ski_championships/

More Pictures  - de Alain Bernier et Guy Laflamme https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151556080554850.1073741825.547494849&type=1

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